Robert Mueller Reveals Counterterrorism Intelligence Techniques Being Used to Combat Healthcare Fraud

We’ve long known that many of the techniques used to combat terrorism derived from the drug war. We’ve known that law enforcement agencies around the country are adopting counterterrorism techniques–and even PATRIOT Act tools–in regular law enforcement.

Robert Mueller just explained that the FBI is taking lessons learned in its counterterrorism intelligence techniques to combat healthcare fraud.

The comment was in response to a question from Amy Klobuchar. She noted that MN has pretty good success at cracking down on healthcare fraud, but inquired about “hot spots” in healthcare fraud.

Mueller responded by lauding the lessons FBI has learned in counterterrorism, then said [these are my notes–I’ll check his exact quote later], “building an intelligence infrastructure across the country allows us to see where … they’re going to go to next,” implying that they were using intelligence techniques to figure out where new healthcare fraud networks were going to pop up next.

Now, as Josh Gerstein noted on Twitter, FBI used the kind of administrative subpoenas now used to combat terrorism before they were used for terrorism. But Mueller’s comment seemed to suggest far more: I assume, given his reference to intelligence networks, FBI is using informants and the like to infiltrate suspected healthcare fraud networks.

I’m all in favor of making sure Medicare and Medicaid money goes to healthcare. But isn’t the use of intelligence networks in the healthcare industry rather invasive?

Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Reddit0Share on Facebook0Google+0Email to someone

11 Responses to Robert Mueller Reveals Counterterrorism Intelligence Techniques Being Used to Combat Healthcare Fraud

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
Emptywheel Twitterverse
bmaz @jujueyeball @mattfwood @dangillmor There are certain specified instances it covers. A man with a gun is not one of them, see e.g. Roof case
bmaz @jujueyeball @mattfwood @dangillmor Um, the pertinent statute is 18 USC §2331. It does NOT provide for domestic terrorism. Even DOJ says so.
JimWhiteGNV @emptywheel Returning to reality sucks.
emptywheel @JimWhiteGNV Whatup, dude? Our overperforming teams flopped on the same day?
bmaz @emptywheel @MasaccioEW @laRosalind But the Pac is so stupid this year, I seriously think USC may beat the Tree in Conf Champ game.
bmaz @emptywheel @MasaccioEW @laRosalind Probably not, but hope is still alive! It ain't over till it's over.
emptywheel @bmaz Stanford's not a player, in spite of McCaffrey's best efforts. @MasaccioEW @laRosalind
JimWhiteGNV Well, that was painful.
emptywheel In 47minutes one tiny fraction of the NSA dragnet will end.
bmaz @MasaccioEW @emptywheel @laRosalind Iowa and Stanford
emptywheel @astepanovich Yup, but this is an area where raising it might make Americans care. @normative @kurtopsahl @justiceunited
December 2011
« Nov   Jan »