Robert Mueller Reveals Counterterrorism Intelligence Techniques Being Used to Combat Healthcare Fraud

We’ve long known that many of the techniques used to combat terrorism derived from the drug war. We’ve known that law enforcement agencies around the country are adopting counterterrorism techniques–and even PATRIOT Act tools–in regular law enforcement.

Robert Mueller just explained that the FBI is taking lessons learned in its counterterrorism intelligence techniques to combat healthcare fraud.

The comment was in response to a question from Amy Klobuchar. She noted that MN has pretty good success at cracking down on healthcare fraud, but inquired about “hot spots” in healthcare fraud.

Mueller responded by lauding the lessons FBI has learned in counterterrorism, then said [these are my notes–I’ll check his exact quote later], “building an intelligence infrastructure across the country allows us to see where … they’re going to go to next,” implying that they were using intelligence techniques to figure out where new healthcare fraud networks were going to pop up next.

Now, as Josh Gerstein noted on Twitter, FBI used the kind of administrative subpoenas now used to combat terrorism before they were used for terrorism. But Mueller’s comment seemed to suggest far more: I assume, given his reference to intelligence networks, FBI is using informants and the like to infiltrate suspected healthcare fraud networks.

I’m all in favor of making sure Medicare and Medicaid money goes to healthcare. But isn’t the use of intelligence networks in the healthcare industry rather invasive?

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11 Responses to Robert Mueller Reveals Counterterrorism Intelligence Techniques Being Used to Combat Healthcare Fraud

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emptywheel DC has its giant pet blimp back but it promised the neighborhood association its blimp won't escape again. https://t.co/nGU2n9Tig9
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emptywheel @Ali_Gharib I don't think he walked anything back--just got more exact. Think what he said got blown out of context. @OKnox @bmaz @SangerNYT
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emptywheel It is true interest groups are how policies get passed. But that also means they don't represent will of voters. https://t.co/qouUlWmvJf
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emptywheel Biased Pluralism and the Defense of “Reality” in the Democratic Primary https://t.co/qouUlWmvJf
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emptywheel @CommsDirector It's more fun to have fund it.
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emptywheel RT @JasonLeopold: Afghan courts said these ex-U.S. detainees should be freed. Why weren’t they? https://t.co/sFXkLoxLun
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bmaz RT @davidminpdx: 11. The NYT declared the Crime Bill "dead." https://t.co/yfECTUDtzp
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bmaz RT @davidminpdx: 10. Stunningly, despite all of the momentum, in Aug 1994, a coalition of left and right stopped the bill. https://t.co/Vpt
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bmaz RT @davidminpdx: 9. Instead he held pep rallies for law enforcement – urging them to lobby for the bill. https://t.co/EbIfLMorFg
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bmaz RT @davidminpdx: 8. But Clinton showed no leadership, did ZERO to rein in "tough on crime" aspects of the bill. https://t.co/WsAxv0il8P
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emptywheel Dow Chemical had a cancer cluster problem so American Chem Council didn't to count cancer victims in its study. https://t.co/QyQMIZL3Jz
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bmaz RT @davidminpdx: 7. The NYT – voice of the liberal establishment – repeatedly called on Clinton to show leadership, rein in excesses. https…
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