Leaked Details of MIT Investigation

The NYT reports details that must come from MIT’s investigation–though the spokesperson insists it’s a review–of its involvement in Aaron Swartz’ arrest and conviction.

There are a few I find of particular interest.

First, MIT claims it learned that Aaron was still downloading JSTOR materials on January 3.

However, on Jan. 3, 2011, according to internal M.I.T. documents obtained by The New York Times, the university was informed that the intruder was back — this time downloading documents very slowly, with a new method of access, so as not to alert the university’s security experts.

Court documents say JSTOR informed MIT about this around Christmas.

The NYT references “a security expert” analyzing MIT’s network.

Early on Jan. 4, at 8:08 a.m., according to Mr. Halsall’s detailed internal timeline of the events, a security expert was able to locate that new method of access precisely — the wiring in a network closet in the basement of Building 16, a nondescript rectangular structure full of classrooms and labs that, like many buildings on campus, is kept unlocked.

This is a detail I’ve long wondered about: who was the expert and what tools did she or he use?

And then there’s the thoroughly unsurprising news that Michael Pickett was with MIT’s head cop when they found Aaron on January 6, 2011.

A little after 2 p.m., according to the government, Mr. Swartz was spotted heading down Massachusetts Avenue within a mile of M.I.T. After being questioned by an M.I.T. police officer, he dropped his bike and ran (according to the M.I.T. timeline, he was stopped by an M.I.T. police captain and Mr. Pickett).

Anyone want to bet they were using some fancy surveillance to find Aaron?

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Emptywheel Twitterverse
bmaz At this point, not only should multiple CPD officers/commanders be charged w/ obstruction, Anita Alvarez should too https://t.co/uWZlknU2Cs
bmaz Photos Show Chicago Police Officer [deleting video] at Burger King Night of Laquan McDonald's Death https://t.co/LvPDRzyEcS via @nbcchicago
bmaz @emptywheel Are there any notable deaths? What happened to the diamonds??
bmaz @brahmresnik @BitterSmith @GeneralBrnovich Who is Bitter Smith's attorney that released the statement you quoted?
bmaz @erinscafe This is false. Kids can play on cactus, they just grow up to be pricks.
bmaz @joanwalsh @PPact Terrible. But fear and loathing is their game. Don't accept or give in.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein There are plenty of very smart people who disagree with me, but from my experience in crim justice system, yes.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein None of this is about "extra penalties". It is about extra govt leverage and investigatory/surveillance abilities.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein ...which with sentencing enhancements is effectively life in prison. How much more can you give an adult human??
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein Think about it: 1st degree murder is either life or death penalty. Even armed kidnapping/robbery is 2nd degree
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein It gives the govt better leverage against suspects/defendants, and WAY more invasive tools+rules to investigate.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein No. For instance in both Dylan Roof+Dear in CO, both are 1stdegree/capital crimes already. What does terrorism add?
January 2013
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