Mazar-e-Sharif

Marja Serves as Microcosm of Military Failure in Afghanistan, But Failure is Country-Wide

Deputy Defense Secretary Aston Carter strolls through Marja marketplace on February 24. How many security forces were present out of camera range?

Back in February of 2010, US President Barack Obama’s surge of troops in Afghanistan began its offensive by trying to take the Marja district of Helmand Province. Then US commander of forces in Afghanistan, General Stanley McChrystal famously touted his counterinsurgency program for the area, saying “We’ve got a government in a box, ready to roll in”.

Eight months into the battle for Marja, we had this:

As U.S. involvement in the war enters its 10th year, the failure to pacify this town raises questions about the effectiveness of America’s overall strategy. Similarly crucial operations are now under way in neighboring Kandahar province, the Taliban’s birthplace.

There are signs the situation in Marjah is beginning to improve, but “it’s still a very tough fight,” said Capt. Chuck Anklam, whose Marine company has lost three men since arriving in July. “We’re in firefights all over, every day.”

“There’s no area that’s void of enemy. But there’s no area void of Marines and [Afghan forces] either,” said Anklam, 34, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. “It’s a constant presence both sides are trying to exert.”

/snip/

The result, so far at least: Residents say the town is more insecure than ever.

“There was peace here before you came,” farmer Khari Badar told one Marine patrol that recently visited his home. “Today, there is only fighting.”

Of course, the Defense Department would have us believe everything is now fine in Marja. They staged a stroll through the marketplace back in February by a Deputy Defense Secretary, presumably to mark the two year anniversary of the offensive. I wonder if this stroll was as heavily protected as John McCain’s 2007 stroll through a Baghdad marketplace.

But even though we are supposed to believe the offensive worked in Marja and the Taliban were routed, there was this from DoD on actions from April 15 of this year: Continue reading

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emptywheel @OKnox What kind of dope schedules a big scoop during Benghazzzzzzzsnore? @Ali_Gharib
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bmaz Lunch at the Beeline Cafe in Payson. Mmmmmm!
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bmaz @laRosalind @emptywheel Guillotine
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emptywheel @boulderdrop Well, as I said, I don't feel comfortable in Cabelas, and I'm an affluent white. I think it's a cultural issue first & foremost
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emptywheel @BrentHalonen1 Yup. Sort of like, "why would you carry all your food in freeze dried form when it's here for the taking?"
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emptywheel @BrentHalonen1 But there's a kind of hyper-competence hunters have that even avid backpackers don't coincide with. So that's source, I think
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emptywheel @BrentHalonen1 I'm pretty comfortable in typical white male midwestern culture: I don't have kids, drink beer, played rugby, watch football
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emptywheel @BrentHalonen1 Mostly I think they were in their element and everything about us made it clear we weren't. No unfriendliness tho (it was WI)
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emptywheel @BrentHalonen1 I know fair amount of women who were raised and trained into hunting culture, not even the rich kind. But I grew up in burbs.
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emptywheel @BrentHalonen1 Even my spouse and (non-hunting) dog. Plus we wanted to see Pats game even after big Packers win. Fish outta water.
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emptywheel @jlassen Yup. I've lived in both and I agree. Relatively lots more $$ invested on toys with big motors here, I think.
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