Ogmundur Jonasson

The International Manhunt for WikiLeaks

One of the things DOJ is protecting from FOIA in Electronic Privacy Information Center’s suit is information other governments have shared with the US on the investigation.

According to FBI’s David Harvey, this includes classified information from foreign governments.

(45) E.O. 13526, § 1.4(b) authorizes the classification of foreign government information. E.O. 13526, § 6.1(s) defines foreign government information as: “(1) information provided to the United States Government by a foreign government or governments, an international organization of governments, or any element thereof, with the expectation that the information, the source of the information, or both, are to be held in confidence; (2) information produced by the United States Government pursuant to or as a result of a joint arrangement with a foreign government or governments, or an international organization of governments, or any element thereof, requiring that the information, the arrangement, or both, are to be held in confidence; or (3) information received and treated as ‘foreign government information’ under the terms of a predecessor order.”

(46) Many foreign governments do not officially acknowledge the existence of some of their intelligence and security services, or the scope of their activities or the sensitive information generated by them. The free exchange of information between United States intelligence and law enforcement services and their foreign counterparts is predicated upon the understanding that these liaisons, and information exchanged between them, must be kept in confidence.

(47) The release of official United States Government documents that show the existence of a confidential relationship with a foreign government reasonably could be expected to strain relations between the United States and the foreign governments and lead to diplomatic, political, or economic retaliations. A breach of this relationship can be expected to have at least a chilling effect on the free flow of vital information to the United States intelligence and law enforcement agencies, which may substantially reduce their effectiveness. Although the confidential relationship of the United States with certain countries may be widely reported, they are not officially acknowledged. (48) Disclosure of such a relationship predictably will result in the careful analysis and possible compromise of the information by hostile intelligence services. The hostile service may be able to uncover friendly foreign intelligence gathering operations directed against it or its allies. This could lead to the neutralization of friendly allied intelligence activities or methods or the death of live sources, cause embarrassment to the supplier of the information, or result in economic or diplomatic retaliation against both the United States and the supplier of the information.

(49) Even if the government from which certain information is received is not named in or identifiable from the material it supplies, the danger remains that if the information were to be made public, the originating government would likely recognize the information as material it supplied in confidence. Thereafter, it would be reluctant to entrust the handling of its information to the discretion of the United States.

(50) The types of classified information provided by foreign government intelligence components can be categorized as: (a) information that identifies a named foreign government and detailed information provided by that foreign government; (b) documents received from a named foreign government intelligence agency and classified “Secret” by that agency; and (c) information that identifies by name, an intelligence component of a specific foreign government, an official of the foreign government, and information provided by that component official to the FBI.

[snip]

(51) The cooperative exchange of intelligence information between the foreign governments and the FBI was, and continues to be, with the express understanding that the information will be kept classified and not released to the public. Disclosure of the withheld information would violate the FBI’s promise of confidentiality. Continue reading

Emptywheel Twitterverse
JimWhiteGNV @ColMorrisDavis Sounds like a criminal conspiracy to me.
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JimWhiteGNV RT @ColMorrisDavis: Syllabus for GEN Hayden's Geo. Mason Univ. spring course req's students buy Jose Rodriguez's whitewashing book ... http…
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JimWhiteGNV RT @stephenbottomly: “@KenRoth: NY Times presses #DOJ to prosecute those who authorized CIA torture #DickCheney. http://t.co/mj0kV3Ehsc” ht…
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JimWhiteGNV Wait, I thought there already was nobody on the internet in North Korea...
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JimWhiteGNV Oh my. Dennis Rodman has a tough job ahead of him now.
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bmaz RT @dcbigjohn: Thanks @bmaz for this! @OKnox and I will play tequila roulette in your honor! http://t.co/SwyGAx0KZy
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bmaz @USPSHelp It has all been found! Thank you!
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JimWhiteGNV RT @GatorZoneBB: #Gators Ranked No. 6 in Collegiate Baseball Preseason Poll #ItsGreatUF http://t.co/FU12KqXCw7
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emptywheel @Popehat can you also represent me in suit v ZD30 for facilitating Party's illegal leaks?
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emptywheel @NickBaumann Any reason to believe she--who bought house in own name-- covert? Even people who were govt has shown great negligence with
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emptywheel @dnvolz not at all. They've used "torture" for some time.
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emptywheel Glad NYT calling for torture prosecution. Pretty funny to call those who refuse to use T-word blinkered apologists bc NYT just adopted Tword
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