security forces

Now That Training in Iraq is a Failure, Petraeus No Longer Mentioned

Screen grab of glorious General Petraeus from US Army recruiting video

A remarkable story in this morning’s Washington Post addresses a report released today from the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.  The report details that the training of police forces in Iraq has been a failure:

Over the course of the eight-year-old war and military occupation, thousands of U.S. troops have spent considerable time and effort wooing and training police recruits, but Iraqi officials have often accused the United States of not providing much more than basic training.

In an August interview, Akeel Saeed, inspector general of the Iraqi Interior Ministry, said that in the past, the U.S. military was too often “implementing what they wanted, without acknowledging what the Iraqis wanted.”

The article discloses that despite all of this basic “training” that the US has provided over the years, now that the program has been handed over to the State Department, they will use the bulk of their $887 million budget this year on private security contractors.  That fact alone is all the proof we need that there is no confidence at all in Iraqi security forces, or there would be little to no need for the mercenaries:

But a government report set for release Monday found that the department is spending just 12 percent of money allocated for the program on advising Iraqi police officials, with the “vast preponderance” of funds going toward the security, transportation and medical support of the 115 police advisers hired for the program. When U.S. troops leave, thousands of private security guards are expected to provide protection for the thousands of diplomats and contractors set to stay behind. For security reasons, the State Department has declined to specify the cost and size of its anticipated security needs.

However, the SIGIR report (pdf) itself provides more background for understanding why such a large mercenary force is needed.  First, the report documents the handing over of responsibility for police training to DoD back in 2004 [INL is the Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs]: Continue reading

Emptywheel Twitterverse
bmaz @joanwalsh @PPact Terrible. But fear and loathing is their game. Don't accept or give in.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein There are plenty of very smart people who disagree with me, but from my experience in crim justice system, yes.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein None of this is about "extra penalties". It is about extra govt leverage and investigatory/surveillance abilities.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein ...which with sentencing enhancements is effectively life in prison. How much more can you give an adult human??
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein Think about it: 1st degree murder is either life or death penalty. Even armed kidnapping/robbery is 2nd degree
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein It gives the govt better leverage against suspects/defendants, and WAY more invasive tools+rules to investigate.
bmaz @speedbudget @Beyerstein No. For instance in both Dylan Roof+Dear in CO, both are 1stdegree/capital crimes already. What does terrorism add?
emptywheel @KevinBuist Damnit! I'm entering with a Ted Cruz doll and a bunch of colorful condoms. Right outside the carousel.
emptywheel @KevinBuist Can we put him in the river? We need river exhibits back!
emptywheel @KevinBuist Ohhh. The tradeoff of getting him in a winning venue w/some more appropriate church setting.
emptywheel @KevinBuist Maybe you can get him to be an exhibit in Art Prize next year.
JimWhiteGNV RT @CJonesScout: Three #Gators in the top eight of PG's college MLB Draft rankings.
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