Hurricane Trash

Apparently there is a big blowhard on the eastern seaboard (no, not talking about Rep. Peter King this time) and it goes by the moniker of Hurricane Joaquin. Another one of those storms of the century…or threats that are petering out…depending on who you believe and what hour of the day it is. Probably be easier to keep track of Mother Nature is Americans would quit gunning themselves down en masse. Anyway, football may be all wet in the east. In the meantime, cable news is all back to the same status quo idiotic conversation about guns. We are a profoundly stupid and insipid nation.

Two contests that may be affected are Alabama at Georgia and Notre Dame at Clemson. The latter sports two teams that are both flaky; don’t trust either one of them. The Tide and Dawgs could really be a great game though. Go Dawgs! In other games, Mississippi State at Texas A & M and Texas Tech could be interesting, and Baylor may use all the points available. ASU visits UCLA, where Josh Rosen and the Bruins will completely destroy the last remnants of what everyone thought would be a great Sun Devil team. But they suck, and that is why they play the games. Todd Graham is NOT a good coach. Get rid of him.

Jets and Fins and Giants at Bills may be affected by the Joaquin moisture. You’d think sloppy conditions would favor the defenses of Jets and Bills. The sleeper game may be the Vikings at Broncos. Adrian Peterson and the Vikes are starting to gel and the Donks, while 3-0, still have that uneasy feeling about them. The local team is hosting the Rams. Rams have a great defense, but the Cardinals are usually a tough nut to crack at home in the Big Toaster. Dallas and the ‘Aints may be a fair fight with no Romo and Bryant.

One other thing: The homestretch on the MLB season is pretty interesting. I really kind of hate that the “first round of the playoffs” is a one game series, but the excitement generated at the end of the season trying to get to that game has really proven awesome. The Astros hung 22 on the DBacks last night and solidified their position, the Angels kept their hope alive by edging the Rangers and the Cubbies ran their ace, Jake Arrieta out for a great performance that might well have earned him the Cy Young. Good stuff.

That’s it for today.

Bmaz is a rather large saguaro cactus in the Southwestern Sonoran desert. A lover of the Constitution, law, family, sports, food and spirits. As you might imagine, a bit prickly occasionally. Bmaz has attended all three state universities in Arizona, with both undergraduate and graduate degrees from Arizona State University, and with significant post-graduate work (in physics and organic chemistry, go figure) at both the University of Colorado in Boulder and the University of Arizona. Married, with both a lovely child and a giant Sasquatch dog. Bmaz has been a participant on the internet since the early 2000’s, including active participation in the precursor to Emptywheel, The Next Hurrah. Formally joined the Emptywheel blog as an original contributing member at its founding in 2007. Bmaz grew up around politics, education, sports and, most significantly, cars; notably around Formula One racing and Concours de Elegance automobile restoration and showing. Currently lives in the Cactus Patch with his lovely wife and beast of a dog, and practices both criminal and civil trial law.
122 replies
  1. Peterr says:

    Nice video. Lots of good rain songs that could go atop this post.
    .
    From this list, #17 might be most appropriate for discussions of football or other sports, especially for those on the losing end of things. “. . . The blues they send to meet me/Won’t defeat me, it won’t be long/Till happiness/Steps up to greet me. . .” Likewise #5 works well for the winners this weekend. I have visions of large linemen in full kit, stepping on and off the curb of the sidewalks of the local strip of campus watering holes and dancing with lampposts.
    .
    Meanwhile with both the Chefs and Royals out of town this weekend, the Arrowhead/Royals stadium complex has been taken over by the American Royal BBQ Competition. Driving home yesterday afternoon past the stadiums, the highways were jammed like there was a sold-out game taking place in the evening. Much to my chagrin, I can’t get there — one of the downsides to having a job that means I work weekends . . . Gonna have to fire up my own grill on Monday night instead.

    • bloopie2 says:

      Since you raised “rain songs” as a topic, can I ask, after 40 years or whatever, what does this mean (if anything)?

      Long as I remember The rain been comin’ down.
      Clouds of myst’ry pourin’ Confusion on the ground.
      Good men through the ages, Tryin’ to find the sun;
      And I wonder, Still I wonder, Who’ll stop the rain.

      I went down Virginia, Seekin’ shelter from the storm.
      Caught up in the fable, I watched the tower grow.
      Five year plans and new deals, Wrapped in golden chains.
      And I wonder, Still I wonder Who’ll stop the rain.

      Heard the singers playin’, How we cheered for more.
      The crowd had rushed together, Tryin’ to keep warm.
      Still the rain kept pourin’, Fallin’ on my ears.
      And I wonder, Still I wonder Who’ll stop the rain.

      • Peterr says:

        The Virginia part is about John Fogerty seeking shelter from the storm of Vietnam. He was in a Virginia Army Reserve unit that ended up not being sent into combat.

        The “heard the singers playin” is about Woodstock.

    • emptywheel says:

      Thinking that Minnesota will be the spoiler for at least one of the good B1G teams this year–they’re not bad.

      But I assume your journalists will be fine, playing at home.

  2. bloopie2 says:

    “We are a profoundly stupid and insipid nation.” It’s a Saturday, and Glenn Greenwald is tweeting. Must be significant? (Nah, it’s only the bombing of an MSF hospital in Afghanistan.) Wonder if Obama will apologize, at least to the families of the dead whiteys.
    .
    Think maybe the billionaires who own the NFL and NCAA might donate one week’s profits to the war victims? Again: Nah. Because A-mur-i-keh, we are exceptional.

  3. dakine01 says:

    In news from the sport where the ball is bigger and round, Louisville is now embroiled in an alleged sex scandal of paying an escort to “provide” for recruits and players

    Kentucky is ‘matching’ up with Eastern Kentucky this week. It should be an easy game but there is some bad blood between the schools (25 or so miles apart) due to a bar fight earlier this year between players from the two. EKU also mourning as a player was killed in a car accident last Saturday night/Sunday morning.

    My Hilltoppers are on the road this week at Rice. ‘Toppers are favored but it is road conference game…

    • scribe says:

      According to the report I read on the Louisville favor-providing story, http://www.ibj.com/articles/55155-book-louisville-hired-prostitutes-to-woo-basketball-recruits some of the escorts/strippers were a mom and her 3 daughters*. Some of the favors were for recruits, some for their dads. Mom kept a journal and her texts. The story is in a book being published by some publishing house in Indianapolis** who supposedly hired a Pulitzer-winning reporter to vet the story.
      Virtual copies of the book, $9.95
      Hard copies $17.95.
      No quote on how much if you want to …. well, to steal an old, old SNL joke.


      * That would be an interesting household, as well as family dynamic.
      **NB: I have no doubt that there is, on some level, an Indy/Louisville basketball rivalry being played out in this story.

        • scribe says:

          Understood, but I was leaning toward (or implying, take your pick) more of a generic inclination for anyone in Indiana being inclined to believe bad things about Louisville, just because. Sort of how Noo Yawk Yankees fans will believe anything bad about Boston, and vice-versa.
          .
          Still, one of the things that keeps (some) people up at nights worrying is the idea of an escort who keeps a diary. The rest of us aren’t worrying but rather look forward to publication.

  4. bloopie2 says:

    What’s your take on the NCAA decision this past week? Ninth Circuit said NCAA was subject to antitrust laws, but didn’t have to pay student athletes for using their likenesses to make money? I’m not clear as to what that means. Sounds like a “punt”, just like the recent NLRB decision vacating the Northwestern students’ ‘right to organize’ victory: Decide it in the marketplace, subject to our oversight — it shouldn’t be decided totally by the courts. The wheels of justice grind slowly.

  5. lefty665 says:

    Jeez, no respect for the ‘Skins and Iggles? They’re playing for the basement of the NFL East, and that may be flooded tomorrow. A slop fest on natural turf in D.C. for sure.

      • Peterr says:

        I doubt it. A Jesuit would know better that to pull a stunt like that, even in jest.
        .
        And these days, for a priest to be in private with a young boy is a definite no-no, and likely a violation of diocesan guidelines. In addition to legal trouble, if his bishop expects any kind of adherence to the guidelines for priests and their interactions with young children, the bishop will be having a few strong words with him as well.

  6. emptywheel says:

    Not happy to see John Harbaugh on U Mich’s sideline today. He may have benefitted from Scobee’s failures THursday but I’m counting on him having all the bad luck in the family.

  7. JohnT says:

    .
    I also have Oklahoma, which I’m a little wary of against West Virginia; Va Tech; Nevada; UCLA is giving a lot of points which I’m also wary of;
    .
    And Oregon. They’re on the road, in Colorado, but that game could be played on the moon and they’d still win. They have to make a statement

  8. Jim White says:

    .
    Today will reveal much on how long it will take McElwain to repair Gator football after the massive damage from Meyer and Muschamp. The Gators built a lot of confidence last week with their dramatic win, but Ole Miss is packed with a huge amount of talent and has been scoring points like crazy.
    .
    Further complicating matters for the Gators is a flu bug running through the team. There are mixed reports on whether Grier will be healthy enough to play, but at least Harris is off suspension if he is needed.
    .
    It has been a very entertaining week as the Gainesville and Oxford police departments have engaged in some very serious trash talk on Twitter: http://www.al.com/sec-cocktail/2015/10/ole_miss_florida_oxford_gainesville_police_department_twitter.html
    .
    I have no idea how the game will go, but would be very happy to see another improbable Gator win.

  9. scribe says:

    Dammit.
    .
    It was supposed to read “Well, my Stillers’ D might not be able to tackle worth a shit, but they do lay hits on people.”
    .
    Sorry if anyone was confused.

    • bloopie2 says:

      That’s okay, I’m always confused, nothing new. For example, I’m confused as to why my Browns are not giving Johny Manziel a full season of starts to let him grow up as an NFL quarterback. At this point in time it really doesn’t matter whether the Browns win or lose a given game. What matters is that they develop their supposed franchise quarterback to the extent possible. Honestly; Josh McCown?

      • scribe says:

        We could arrange for Young Mr. Football to have a relapse of self-medication. Just start him when the Brownies come to Pittsburgh. See, supra, Exhibit A: Steve Smith, Sr. I’m still waiting for Silverback Harrison to get and take the chance to turn his arrogant little smirk into part of a smoking crater mid-field at the Big Ketchup Bottle.
        .
        Seriously, if I were running the Browns* I wouldn’t be starting Manziel. He needs to get a feel for the speed of the game from the sidelines and how a team works. This ain’t Aggie-land any more and Manziel cannot carry a pro team the way he did the Aggies. No one can. And more than a couple very talented QBs spent more than a little while as the backup learning the trade. See, e.g., Mr. Discount Doublecheck Rodgers and see also Steve Young and Tom Brady. Recall, please, there was a great hue and cry about Rodgers replacing Favruh The Ancient One, both here, in Green Bay, and on the internets. Young was never gonna be more than Joe Cool’s backup, and a dubious one at that. Brady was the bottom-round draft pick who would manage the game and fill in for Bledsoe until he got healthy again. Manziel is, by virtue of the money paid him, too valuable to be trotted out there to satisfy the Dawg Pound by throwing them fresh, immature meat.

        *I’d be doing a better job than current management. But anyone not taking draft advice from the homeless guy living outside team HQ would be, too.

  10. lefty665 says:

    “He needs to get a feel for the speed of the game from the sidelines and how a team works.” It’s a better vantage point for the team than on the field, as RG3 has proved in D.C.

    • scribe says:

      Ask RG3’s knees about learning game speed on the field. He was a case of an idiot billionaire owner forcing an injured player out there for not much return.

  11. Peterr says:

    After years of getting trashed by the Longhorns, it sure looks like TCU is returning the favor in spades today. 37-0 at halftime.

    • JohnT says:

      The Fighting Journalists are bringing it. Nice job Fitzgerald
      .
      Thought it’d be closer because in the last ten, head to head with the Gophers, NW is only 2-8 ATS

  12. emptywheel says:

    Told ya the Fighting Journalists would be fine at home.

     

    Now I just gotta start hoping they’ll do worse away next week.

    • Peterr says:

      Their D is something else. Last week Ball State outscored the combination of Stanford, Eastern Illinois, and Duke combined against the FJs, mostly because of a slew of defensive injuries. That had me worried going into today’s game, but they clearly were just fine. Holding the Gophers under 100 yards rushing and 100 yards passing was very nice.

  13. Peterr says:

    the Cubbies ran their ace, Jake Arrieta out for a great performance that might well have earned him the Cy Young

    Would be great to see him pitching game one in the World Series. If it ends with the Cubs vs Royals, I could be in a world of hurt here in KC.

  14. JohnT says:

    .
    Holy Smoke
    .
    While I’ve been distracted by football, The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad is on TCM
    .
    Ray Harryhausen was a genius

  15. lefty665 says:

    peterr You apparently have a higher opinion of Jesuits than I do. Don’t think I’ve ever seen “jest” and “Jesuit” in the same sentence before. Tks for a new experience on a rainy day.

    scribe, You’re right, and I doubt Snyder will ever learn. Griffin’s also been painfully unable to figure out the NFL, which is strange since it’s his knees and noggin at risk. Half the time I feel for him, the other half it’s WTF.

    • Peterr says:

      I got to know a bunch of Jesuits while doing my doctoral work, and they all had great senses of humor. One of them invited me to attend worship in the big Oakland parish where he was on staff, and it happened to be the last Sunday in October. In the Lutheran church, that’s Reformation Sunday, though for obvious reasons it is not celebrated that way in the Catholic church. Since I was not in a parish at that time because of my doctoral work, I was free, and so took him up on the offer.
      .
      The mass rolled along quite nicely, and then I almost fell out of my seat as the Offertory music played while the altar was being prepared for communion and the gifts were being gathered in the congregation. The organist began playing “A Mighty Fortress” (instrumental only, not sung). I looked to the other side of the chancel, and there was my Jesuit friend, who gave me a wink.
      .
      After worship, he asked what I thought of the mass. I told him that this parish clearly understands making the stranger feel welcome. He laughed, and said “Yeah, I had a little word with the organist . . .”

      • emptywheel says:

        Btw, one of the most remarkable stops on my Baltic cruise this summer was mass in Visby Sweden. The town has a ton of ruined Catholic Churches from the Hanseatic league period, when the town was quite rich. There were a few very big protestant churches.

        A priest on the boat noted there was an active Catholic Church, but it was teeny, from the outside. The inside was mostly very very plain.

        More remarkable, the church was built into the ruins of a prior, much larger church, with a window overlooking another ruin. Mass was in Swedish but the hymns were in Latin. It was as much a lesson about the folly of hubris as anything else, but it seemed to have a very dynamic parish, and did a great job integrating the children (including the one African family) into the ceremony.

      • lefty665 says:

        Sorry I responded to bloopie2 in the first place. As you may infer, my mileage with Jesuits has varied.
        .
        Isn’t that sweet. “A little word with the organist” Yep, that’s a Jesuit. “Nice kneecaps you got there, be a shame to see something happen to them, play this tune hymn or I’ll see you burn in Hell for eternity”.
        .
        The Jesuits started as torturers and murderers for the Pope during the inquisition, ask Galileo. If you think they’ve changed in the last 400 years, think again. Obama’s moral mentor, Jesuit John Brennan, picks out the women and children to dismember and incinerate in our drone wars, favoring “Hellfire” missiles, how apropos. I’ve got no use for religious fanatics be they jihadi, jesuit or apostolic. All they’ve ever brought the world is death and suffering all dressed up as “God’s will”.

        • Peterr says:

          The “having a word with the organist” was very much bringing the organist in on the joke, not forcing him to do something. The organist greeted me later with an even bigger grin on his face.
          .
          And I know that there are Jesuits who lack a sense of humor, and whose vision of the church is more authoritarian. Still, when I look at the various factions in the Vatican hierarchy, the ones that worry and scare me with their overbearing arrogance and lust for power, it’s not Jesuits that I worry about.
          .
          I may be mistaken, but I don’t think John Brennan ever was a Jesuit. He went to a Jesuit-run school, but I have never heard of him professing his vows and then being released from them. I’m as disgusted by you at what is being done in our name by Brennan and his intelligence pals, but I would be slow to attribute his work to his Jesuit teachers. If anything, I think they’d be appalled at the lack of logic and rigorous thinking that he brings to work.

          • scribe says:

            Blaming the Jesuits for Brennan is like blaming the West Point Honor Code for Petraeus.
            .
            As to the latter, the honest ones don’t need it, and the dishonest ones merely learn how to be better, more slippery, more skilled liars and to get away with it.

              • phred says:

                I remember a joke I once heard in a movie… What’s the difference between Methodists and Baptists? Methodists can sing ; )
                .
                I was raised Methodist and I still love to sing : )

                • orionATL says:

                  :)

                  yes, the best part of any methodist service were the hymns: all printed, all verses, and neatly numbered in the hymnal.

                  i must say i actually enjoyed the sermons in my childhood because they were most often thoughtful, comprehensible lessons by well-educated men (women preachers came later).

                  today i find, by contrast, preachers who seem to have been called to witness not for their thoughtfulness but for their capacity to scream “jesus christ” and “christ’s love” at least two dozen times in an hour. but maybe that’s because these days i only end up in church for funerals, since all our generation’s children are married and approaching middle-age.

        • John Casper says:

          Inquisition started in the 12th century. Galileo and the Jesuits come along in the 16th. Not doubting you, but if you have links to Jebs as torturers, I’d like to see them. Like all Roman Catholic clerics, they have a lot to answer for. But there’s another side, “Pope Praises Jesuit Missions In Paraguay After Apology For Church Crimes Against Indigenous Peoples.”
          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/pope-praises-jesuit-missions-in-paraguay-after-apology-for-church-crimes-against-indigenous-peoples_55a26421e4b0a47ac15cb53f

          Jesuits have always been strong on education, supporters of Liberation Theology, See “Six Jesuit martyrs of El Salvador http://www.catholic-chaplaincy.org.uk/the-six-jesuit-martyrs-of-el-salvador/ ; Ratzinger ignored altar boy abuse to go after Jesuit theologians.

          • orionATL says:

            electing josej ratzinger as pope was a bit like electing dick cheney to succeed g.w. bush as president. the german ratzinger was an implacable intellectual foe of liberation theology.

            as for the republican party’s war on central america in “it’s morning in america” days:

            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_of_the_Americas_Watch

            the perversely named “school of the americas” was an american institution set up in the military base in colombus, ga. to train central and south american military officers in “counter-……”.

            sound familiar?

            protests and vigils, often led by priests or nuns, were routinely held at the gates of the base with, eventually, some effect. but, of course, not without lots of pro-forma arrests and jailings of these american citizens for expressing their heartfelt opinions. oh to be a corporation!

            vigil:

            [… Presente! litany

            The Presente! litany is a memorial litany in which the names of people killed in political repression (usually in Central and South America) are recited. This litany is used at the annual memorial service held at the gates of the School of the Americas in Columbus, Georgia, for those killed by graduates of the school.[9] In Spanish, “Presente” means “here” or “present”, when responding to a roll call.

            The tradition of reading names of those killed by politically repressive regimes has a long tradition in Latin America. At the funeral of Pablo Neruda on September 25, 1973 in Chile, Hernán Loyala reports that mourners responded with “Presente” (meaning “he/she (the victim) is here”) to the shouting out of Neruda’s name, as well as that of Salvador Allende, the recently deposed (and killed) president:

            Two days later Neruda’s body was taken out of the ransacked house. Loyola recollected: “A considerable group of workers and students had gathered outside in the street, and I heard the first shouts: ‘Comrade Pablo Neruda!’ someone screamed and all the others answered: ‘Present!’ The cortege left in a defiant column (any massive demonstration was, of course, forbidden) … and the column grew along the way. Arriving at the general Cemetery along the Avenida de la Paz, the funeral became an impressive popular protest, the first since September 11 … I confess I was frozen with fear, because the people began singing the Internationale in a crescendo. Suddenly, I found that I had my fist in the air and was singing. Soldiers, armed to the teeth, surrounded the square opposite the cemetery and I sincerely believed that, in a matter of seconds, they would let off a round of machine-gun fire. When someone in a loud voice began to shout: ‘Comrade Pablo Neruda!’ we all answered ‘Present![10]

            This was the first public act of protest against the 14-day-old government of Augusto Pinochet …]

            from wikipedia, cited above.

            the installation of pinochet was just one of our central intelligence agency’s spectacularly unintelligent interventions. but then, that was in the days before niger yellow cake, etc.

            need i add, liberation theology was (and remains) precisely the fuse to light the equivalent of the french revolution in latin america, central america, and the carribean – that is, the revolution of the 1790’s that followed on the heels of the american revolution.

  16. Peterr says:

    Indiana is up 3-0 over the Sweatervests at the end of the first quarter? Indiana, that came within a whisker of being beaten by FCS Southern Illinois in Bloomington?

  17. Ed Walker says:

    Nice of trashwriter to mention the Sixth-Ranked but flaky Irish. Unfortunately, the game is tomorrow morning in Paris, so I’ll just have to find out the outcome in the morning.

  18. Peterr says:

    Texas Tech and Baylor are clearly on track to bust the over/under in their game. 35-14 with 11:15 left in the first half. I can’t watch the game, so I have to ask: did their defensive players even dress for the game?

    • Jim White says:

      .
      I caught bits of it.
      .
      It’s now only halftime, but with the Gators leading Ole Miss 25-0, I’m working on turning the intolerable meter up to 11.

      • emptywheel says:

        I’m sure you’re up for the challenge. A little worried about Armando overloaded intolerable tho.

  19. Peterr says:

    Both Texas and Texas Tech go down, to TCU and Baylor respectively — and neither was anywhere close to close. Lots of wailing and gnashing of teeth at the big boys going down.

  20. bmaz says:

    Oh Golden Domers, you magnificent bastards. Wow, that last two point conversion….what the fuck was that call Brian Kelly???
    .
    Oh, and congrats to the Sun Devils. But coach Todd Graham still sucks hugely.
    .
    And belated congrats to Jim and his Gators. Unexpectedly awesome performance today.

  21. bmaz says:

    Wow, it was exactly one year ago that Tom Brady’s obituary was being written far and wide:

    Three hundred and sixty five days ago, a lot of people who write or talk about sports for a living thought it was prudent to declare Tom Brady’s football career, at least as an elite player, essentially finished. The Patriots had just been thoroughly whipped by the Kansas City Chiefs 41-14 on Monday Night Football, and Brady looked miserable and played like it as well. He was sacked, battered and eventually relieved of his duties amid the blowout. Afterward, Bill Belichick was asked if it was time to “evaluate” the QB situation. The 2-2 Patriots were in trouble, and Brady was, in the opinion of many: weak, washed-up, scared, soft and done.
    .
    Brady was not quite washed up, scared or done at age 37. A reluctant but brave scribe asked Belichick if “the quarterback position would be evaluated” as New England prepared for Cincinnati, and Belichick responded with a snort like someone had just asked him if he could name every Kardashian. That moment will almost certainly live in infamy.

    How’s that working out for Roger Goodell and the NFL?

  22. JohnT says:

    Ok my college picks sucked. I figured Va Tech at home would play better; the FJ’s played better than expected; UCLA evidently went all Hollywood, and got full of themselves
    .
    But was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?
    .
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7vtWB4owdE
    .
    No
    .
    On to the big guys. I picked the Ravens; Jets; Panthers and Vikings
    .
    I figured Big Ben being out would’ve been a big factor, and the Ravens should have been desperate. The Jets have a pretty good defense. The Panthers are good, even though I’m not a fan of sCam Newton, and Tampa seems to be resurrecting their half of their half of the bay of pigs teams
    .
    http://www.packerwire.net/read.php?2,136116
    .
    Don’t be surprised if the Vikings sneak out of Mile High with a win, because they’ve always matched up well with the Broncos. In the all time series, the Vikings are 7-6, and they’re only separated by eight points all time. Manning is Manning, but he’s not the QB from 10 years ago. On the other hand, Adrian Peterson is still in his prime, despite all efforts by King Rodger, and the Vikings defensive line has got to be rated in the top five in the NFL. The Broncos are -6 1/2 in this game. I’ll take the Vikes

    • phred says:

      Thanks for the article on the racist history of the Washington NFL team, I had no idea…
      .
      And while I am happy for you and other friends with the unfortunate affliction of being Vikings fans, I will never be able to cheer for Peterson. Never.

      • JohnT says:

        Yea, I wouldn’t try to change your mind, because you have valid reasons
        .
        You wouldn’t do what he did, and I wouldn’t do what he did, and the majority of people in the country wouldn’t do what he did. But, in much of the south and the central part of the country, I don’t think you could come up with a jury without at least two people who aren’t fervent believers in ‘spare the rod spoil the child’
        .
        I think since, he’s shown remorse and, no one can predict with absolute certainty that he won’t do it again. But I don’t think it’s likely

        • phred says:

          Fair enough. I do believe in repentance, redemption, and forgiveness. So I hope you are right that Peterson has learned something from all of this. But, cheering is something else entirely and I can’t bring myself to cheer for a guy who pulled down the pants of a 4 year old and whipped him until he bled.
          .
          Sorry for being intransigent, I know what it is like to support a team in spite of the presence of players you might rather not have on your team (cf. Chmura ; ) So good luck to your Purple People Eaters all the same…

  23. bloopie2 says:

    Why does anybody give a flying fuck about the Belichick and what he says? Just stop, it is irrelevant.

    • bmaz says:

      So, you think some stunt by that jackass clerk from Kentucky, defrauding some guy residing in Italy, has some significance?
      .
      Nice. And what, pray tell, do you suggest is the lingering significance of that horseshit?
      .
      Just so everybody is on the same page, Bloopie is parroting a tweet I made earlier today without explaining the context. But, hey, why should there be context, right Big Bloopie?

      • bloopie2 says:

        I thought your tweet was (is) well-phrased and I simply chose to appropriate its language (without attribution) to fit into the current context of ‘scribes vs. Belichicks’. Guess I succeeded, eh? Anyhow, off to the Tube to see my Brownies trounce Philip Rivers. Really.

  24. scribe says:

    The indiscipline and arrogance Fat Rex brings to his teams just cost the Bills a pretty TD pass – yet another unsportsmanlike conduct penalty, this one for a chop block.
    .
    LMFAO

  25. bmaz says:

    Okay, real talk here for a second (No, Ms. Wheel, not Real Housewives talk):
    .
    Is there anybody who thinks Fan Duel, Draft Kings, and other professional DFS schemes are NOT outright gambling??

    • phred says:

      Definitely outright gambling. I’m surprised it’s legal, even more surprised that the NFL announcers have been promoting FanDuel.

      • bmaz says:

        The league itself has quietly encouraged it. Have you noticed how much attention ESPN pays it, and how much advertising for DFS they carry? ESPN does’;t do anything touching on the NFL without NFL sign off. The short story is that the NFL wants to monetize DFS.
        .
        It gets even better if you drill down into DFS, not only is “the house winning”, but the houses are using each other to cheat and defraud the average Joe Public they are sucking into playing their sites. Here is yet another article on that.

        • phred says:

          Thanks for the links, those are helpful. I played Fantasy Football for a couple of years with a small group of friends, but I quit because I dislike the way it distorts the way one watches the sport. Football (and every other team sport) is a TEAM sport with the success or failure of any individual player dependent on the play of the rest of the team. If Rodgers had a terrible O-line, he wouldn’t have the stats he has. So for me, the whole premise of fantasy pick-your-sport is a fraud.
          .
          I don’t watch much ESPN, but I have noticed when I run across it that they talk a lot about fantasy sports, which seems odd to me. Clearly, ESPN/NFL must see some business value in it… Maybe they sell more jerseys or something???
          .
          In any case, where there is gambling, the house ALWAYS wins and the players ALWAYS lose. Watching the FanDuel ads is particularly alarming given the sums their featured players have won, it is clear that a phenomenal amount of money is being lost.

    • Bay State Librul says:

      Red Sox lose but Don Orsillo wins

      —–

      Sox players salute as Mookie makes the final out.
      —-

      Fifteen years Don, thanks.
      —-
      and Jerry

      • phred says:

        I’m so glad that Orsillo has lined up such a great new job. But, I’m still hugely peeved with the Red Sox. Idiots.

    • JohnT says:

      It sure looks like gambling to me. And it’s something that I haven’t gotten into yet. Dunno if I ever will
      .
      On the other hand, my four teamer hit, thanks to taking the points in the Broncos Vikings game. I would have rather they won, but personally winning makes the loss easier to swallow

    • bmaz says:

      No, they are domestic corporations that have, so far, exploited a “loophole” in law. It is, however, hard to see how they can continue to operate as they currently are without it leading to legalized sports gambling across the board.

      • Bay State Librul says:

        It’s skill baby?

        —–

        Your lawyers friends made it happen and I love it. Makes the game more interesting when
        you have money on the line

        —–

        Banned in Arizona.

        Would you play if you lived in another state?

        —–

        After Brady, there is no such thing as “integrity of the game”

        Goodell is a liar

        —-

        Of course it is gambling

        • bmaz says:

          No, I think it is absolutely worthless and idiotic. And no friends of mine had anything to do with it.
          .
          Also the Rams are killing the Cardinals.

          • phred says:

            Speaking of gambling… Your frickin’ Cards (with an assist from the Bills) are killing me in my bragging rights football pool this week. I. am. not. happy. ; P

          • Bay State Librul says:

            You play powerball?

            It’s more fun, try it and you’ll be hooked

            I thought loophole was a required legal course for graduation.

  26. bloopie2 says:

    Okay, the Browns lose again. Granted, last minute to an excellent quarterback, but still. I get to watch them once game on network TV, and, well, what’s the point any more? I need to have been born in another town. Anyone got a good candidate? No place that’s got star power, but perhaps an up and coming underdog.

  27. scribe says:

    BMAz, you’re just a bandwagon-jumping, pink-hat-wearing Johnny come lately fan of Cheatin’ Bill and his Cheating Cheaters.
    .
    Stay true to your Packers and moan over the Cardinals and you’ll be all right. Don’t try to be something (A Patsies fan) you’re not.
    .
    Chip Kelly looks more and more the genius every day.

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