Will James Clapper Be the First Known Victim of OmniCISA’s Regulatory Immunity?

According to Medium, Crackas With Attitude just hacked James Clapper and his wife.

One of the group’s hackers, who’s known as “Cracka,” contacted me on Monday, claiming to have broken into a series of accounts connected to Clapper, including his home telephone and internet, his personal email, and his wife’s Yahoo email. While in control of Clapper’s Verizon FiOS account, Cracka claimed to have changed the settings so that every call to his house number would get forwarded to the Free Palestine Movement.

[snip]

The hacker also sent me a list of call logs to Clapper’s home number. In the log, there was a number listed as belonging to Vonna Heaton, an executive at Ball Aerospace and a former senior executive at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. When I called that number, the woman who picked up identified as Vonna Heaton. When I told her who I was, she declined to answer any questions.

Viscerally, I’m laughing my ass off that Verizon (among others) has shared Clapper’s metadata without his authority. “Not wittingly,” they might say if he asks them about that. But I recognize that it’s actually not a good thing for someone in such a sensitive position to have his metadata exposed (I mean, to the extent that it wasn’t already exposed in the OPM hack).

I would also find some amusement if Clapper ends up being the first public victim of OmniCISA’s regulatory immunity for corporations.

Yahoo and Verizon can self-report this cyber intrusion to DHS, and if they do then the government can’t initiate regulatory action against them for giving inadequate protection from hacking for the Director of National Intelligence’s data.

And whether or not Clapper is the first victim of OmniCISA’s regulatory immunity, he is among the first Americans that the passage of OmniCISA failed to protect from hacking.

 

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy Wheeler is an independent journalist writing about national security and civil liberties. She writes as emptywheel at her eponymous blog, publishes at outlets including the Guardian, Salon, and the Progressive, and appears frequently on television and radio. She is the author of Anatomy of Deceit, a primer on the CIA leak investigation, and liveblogged the Scooter Libby trial.

Marcy has a PhD from the University of Michigan, where she researched the “feuilleton,” a short conversational newspaper form that has proven important in times of heightened censorship. Before and after her time in academics, Marcy provided documentation consulting for corporations in the auto, tech, and energy industries. She lives with her spouse and dog in Grand Rapids, MI.

7 replies
  1. bloopie2 says:

    Does CISA require, in order to trigger immunity, that the provider (e.g, Verizon) be the one to report to DHS? Or can someone else (like Medium or Crackas) report it and trigger? If the latter, wouldn’t that be fun? Hack someone, then tell DHS, and your “someone” is without recourse.

  2. Giles Byles says:

     
    Did they ever figure out how the database of 191 million voters appeared on the open Internetz out of nowhere, back around Christmas?  Gee, how did that get there.  No, we’ll never know.  That’s what all this incontinent sharing is good for.  How many ISP employees have access to things that used to be considered “secret”?  How many thousands of dodgy, overpaid contractors have “top secret” stuff on unencrypted thumb drives & laptops?  It’s like an STD epidemic in the datacenter, only it’s our collective data that’s being spewed around & not genetic material.
     
    This is only the beginning of an era of massive databases suddenly made public that nobody can account for.  You can’t trace them back to a source because there is no accountability possible, “no chain of custody” therefor.
     
    TPTB were so busy sneaking CISA through Congress, they failed to consider the obvious downsides.  How long before they realize & address the enormity of their error?

    • martin says:

      quote”How long before they realize & address the enormity of their error?”quote

      Congress? Hahaha. They couldn’t find their ass with two hands and a mirror. If anything, they’ll double down with the same stupidity they used on CISA.

      • bmaz says:

        Just to be crystal clear, “Martin” is yet another disingenuous sock puppet screen name (a practice completely, dishonestly and impertinently against our rules) for the long time scourge here, “Wallace”.

  3. martin says:

    “Not wittingly,” they might say if he asks them about that.

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA…HOHOHOHOHOHOHOHO…HEEEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHE…HAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAA!

    Oh man, that makes my day! Not wittingly. I hope that fucking liar of liars is choking on this as I type. Congress too. I’d bet ..er..hope..heads are exploding exponentially across WDC. Look at this pathetic schmuck…

    https://motherboard-images.vice.com/content-images/contentimage/29537/1452619591884590.png

    quote”But I recognize that it’s actually not a good thing for someone in such a sensitive position to have his metadata exposed “unquote

    Bullshit. This is the scum sucking totalitarian wannabe who’s lied through his teeth to Wyden in front of the entire planet, helped set up the US surveillance state, and generally burned the 4th Amendment to ashes. I wouldn’t care if this motherfucker was skinned alive, let alone his so called metadata put on the net. We’re talking someone the Framers would have HUNG.

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