Drone Pilots to Control Four Planes at Once: What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FK4nh5I0jpE[/youtube]

So soon on the heels of this week’s disclosure that seventeen percent of US drone pilots show signs of clinical distress and the debacle of the RQ-170 Sentinel drone being recovered and put on display by Iran, today’s latest announcement on drones reads like a piece from The Onion or Andy Borowitz.  In what appears to be all seriousness, the US is looking into the possibility of single drone operators controlling as many as four drones at one time:

Western militaries are experimenting with having future drone pilots command up to four aircraft at once, adding new potential challenges even as a top-secret U.S. drone’s crash in Iran exposed the risks of flying unmanned aircraft thousands of miles away.

And why would such a foolish move be necessary?  Why, it all comes down to insatiable demand for drone use and a military that wants to cut back on costs:

To save money and make unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) less reliant on massive ground support crews, weapons manufacturers are working with military officials to develop more autonomous control systems and improve networking among planes.

At the moment, it can take hundreds of support staff on the ground to run a single drone for 24 hours, adding cost and complications at a time when budget-cutters are looking for billions of dollars of program cuts.

But new high-tech networking systems and ground stations in development would let a single pilot fly four drones, possibly even from different manufacturers, dramatically reducing the ground staff now needed for each plane.

Early work on such systems has been going on for some time, but heavy demand for more drones and mounting budget pressures are now bringing them closer to operational use.

If the US does institute such a foolish practice, let’s just hope none of the stressed out operators decide to channel their inner Charlie Callas.

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Emptywheel Twitterverse
JimWhiteGNV Tide finally turning? Jordan Davis' murderer convicted! In Florida, no less.
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JimWhiteGNV RT @AP: BREAKING: Florida man convicted of 1st-degree murder for killing teenager after argument over loud music.
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emptywheel RT @alexisgoldstein: Shorter Eric Holder: "if only someone with power would do something about these oversized, unaccountable banks!" https…
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emptywheel @JimWhiteGNV To be fair, that kind of arrangement (cough, Bandar) is prolly one reason our intel on Syria is so bad.
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emptywheel @pwnallthethings Yep. But their number one rec was ... to do what Apple is now defaulting to. And Apples about half of stolen phones.
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JimWhiteGNV I understand that Louie Gohmert plans to hire the Khorasan Group as consultants to search for new head of SS.
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JimWhiteGNV RT @GreggJLevine: Ask not if sexism played a role in 30-year Secret Service vet Pierson's promotion; ask if it contributed to her ouster.
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emptywheel 3.1 million Americans had their smart phone stolen last year (Apple has ~45% market). http://t.co/6flb8CXbfe Consumer Report fix? passcode!
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emptywheel @noir Nope. Just no one is actually talking abt existing data.
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JimWhiteGNV @ClaireAdida @smsaideman Or is it more likeKarpinski for Abu Ghraib? Widespread problem w/woman taking biggest hit.
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emptywheel @ericghill 1,200 iPhones stolen in San Francisco alone last year. You'd get to 5,000 device requests pretty quickly from stolen phones
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