Three Months after Latif’s Death, “Transparent” Gitmo Reveals Acute Pneumonia

Roughly 11 years to the day after he was captured by Pakistanis to be sold for bounty and over 3 months after his death, Adnan Latif has returned to Yemen, a partly-decayed corpse.

In the statement announcing his remains have been repatriated, Gitmo revealed a new detail about how he died.

The medical examiner also concluded that acute pneumonia was a contributing factor in his death.

You gotta ask why a guy with acute pneumonia was put in solitary. I also wonder whether years of forced feeding contributes to pneumonia?

Not to worry, though, because Gitmo says they take care of detainees. Here’s the last paragraph of the statement:

Joint Task Force Guantanamo continues to provide safe, humane, and lawful care and custody of detainees. This mission is being performed professionally, transparently, and humanely by the men and women of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. [my emphasis]

It took two and a half months to learn Latif committed suicide. We’re only now learning he suffered from acute pneumonia. And we still do not officially know how badly his head injury–the one the government claims didn’t really exist so they could keep him detained–expressed itself while at Gitmo, much less the drugs he was being given, ostensibly for that and mental health problems.

Don’t worry though. Gitmo operates transparently.

May you rest in peace, Adnan.

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bmaz RT @JoshMankiewicz: My father Frank Mankiewicz has passed away after a wonderful life. He was the best dad I could ever have wished for. ht…
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bmaz @BernardKingIII Only thing it ever got me was in contempt. Which was thankfully dropped by judge when guilty verdict returned.
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bmaz @KanysLupin @MonaHol @normative @trevortimm @onekade @FareedZakaria Yeah, starry eyed people like to talk nullification, but doesn't happen
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bmaz @BernardKingIII I mean, seriously, only law professors would come up with that theoretical drivel. And Zakaria still screwed it up.
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bmaz @MonaHol @KanysLupin @normative @trevortimm @onekade @FareedZakaria If so, you should be prosecuted for perjury.
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bmaz @McBlondeLand @nycsouthpaw Was also a real thing in southern Arizona back in late 80's - 90's Biosphere: http://t.co/YrTSfTqpVI
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bmaz @MonaHol @normative @trevortimm @onekade @FareedZakaria Rule 24 leaves discretion on void dire method to court. Some do it some let attys
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bmaz @GrantWoods Seconded. Body broke down before his heart did.
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bmaz @normative @MonaHol @trevortimm @onekade @FareedZakaria But they don't. Juries are told MUST follow the law, and they try very hard to do so
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bmaz @trevortimm @mattapuzzo @FareedZakaria Rules of evidence have evolved quite a bit since then, but not in ways likely to get much motive in.
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bmaz @trevortimm @onekade @FareedZakaria In fairness, his experts don't seem to fully grasp the realities of such a trial really either.
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