DNI’s Latest “I Con” Speak: “Sift Through and Have Unfettered Access To”

The Director of National Intelligence, after having repeatedly refused to answer any questions about the WSJ’s big scoop in yesterday’s conference call, has released a new document pretending to debunk stories based on the WSJ (though not the WSJ itself). It reads, in part,

Press reports based on an article published in today’s Wall Street Journal mischaracterize aspects of NSA’s activities conducted under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The NSA does not sift through and have unfettered access to 75% of the United States’ online communications.

The following are the facts:

  • Media reports based upon the recent Wall Street Journal (WSJ) article regarding NSA’s foreign intelligence activities provide an inaccurate and misleading picture of NSA’s collection programs, but especially with respect to NSA’s use of Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).
  • The reports leave readers with the impression that NSA is sifting through as much as 75% of the United States’ online communications, which is simply not true.
  • In its foreign intelligence mission, and using all its authorities, NSA “touches” about 1.6%, and analysts only look at 0.00004%, of the world’s internet traffic.

Obviously, the government partly obscures its answer by presenting the global numbers when trying to debunk US numbers.

But more importantly, it builds a gigantic straw man with its “sift through and have unfettered access to” language. That’s not what the WSJ said (which is why DNI shifts its accusation).

The system has the capacity to reach roughly 75% of all U.S. Internet traffic in the hunt for foreign intelligence, including a wide array of communications by foreigners and Americans. In some cases, it retains the written content of emails sent between citizens within the U.S. and also filters domestic phone calls made with Internet technology, these people say.

[snip]

The surveillance system is built on relationships with telecommunications carriers that together cover about 75% of U.S. Internet communications.

The NSA doesn’t do all the sifting. The telecoms Americans are paying every month do the first sift (which means part of that 75% of US Internet traffic is inaccessible to the NSA).

But see what DNI doesn’t ever do? Refute the WSJ.

Which I assume means we can take as confirmation that the government and its pseudo-private partners the telecoms do, in fact, sift through 75% of US Internet traffic.

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4 Responses to DNI’s Latest “I Con” Speak: “Sift Through and Have Unfettered Access To”

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Emptywheel Twitterverse
JimWhiteGNV Tweet deck come back! Please!
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emptywheel Last link from here: http://t.co/OcumtSRZvF Pillar also notes that climate is a DIRECT threat, not just threat multiplier.
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emptywheel Paul Pillar bemoans "continued prominence of US pol figures whose views on climate sound more in tune w/days when Earth thought to be flat"
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JimWhiteGNV Why does my cat get angry with me when I sneeze?
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bmaz For NSA CTO Patrick Dowd and Keith Alexander, craven opportunism is not so much a revolving door as an umbilical cord http://t.co/SgAG2hJINZ
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emptywheel @Thomas_Drake1 And a teeny bit of thought abt why the govt might use defeat lists. @KenDilanianAP
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emptywheel @Thomas_Drake1 But yes, most of it is redacted. It just takes a bit of knowledge of CT cases to compare. @KenDilanianAP
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emptywheel @Thomas_Drake1 This wasn't exactly censored (which is how I know abt it). Even showed up in testimony! @KenDilanianAP
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emptywheel RT @NACDL: Investigation: "Confidential informants are an integral but problematic part of federal law enforcement" - @richelord http://t.c…
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emptywheel @onekade Just you. Also don't mind that O is reversing his stance abt coercive interrogations.
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emptywheel @granick Unless of course the "n" was "corrupt banksters." That'd be like shooting fish in haystack. But not interested there. @mattblaze
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emptywheel @granick That the "n" they're targeting is too small for algos to actually find the dots out of the haystack? @mattblaze
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