Sentinel Drone

What WAS Our Sentinel Drone Surveilling in Iran?

Kevin Drum captures where the state of the reporting on the story that the MEK, backed by Israel, is responsible for the assassinations of Iranian scientists and the implication that that makes Israel a state that sponsors terrorism. Drum writes,

Are the attacks on Iran terrorism? Of course they are. If they’re not, we might as well give up on even trying to define the word. But is it acceptable just because the other side is using it? Of course it’s —

But wait a second. Is it? For all practical purposes, Iran and Israel are at war; they’ve been at war for a long time; and both sides have tacitly agreed that it will primarily be a war carried out nonconventionally. The alternative is what we did in Afghanistan and Iraq: a full-scale conventional attack.

Is that a superior alternative? To say the least, I’m a little hard pressed to say it is. But the alternative is not to fight back at all. Given the current state of the art in human nature, that’s really not in the cards.

Still: is it terrorism? Yes. Do both sides use it? Yes. Is this, in many cases, the future of warfare? Probably yes.

The only question I’d raise is a chicken and an egg thing. Who attacked whom first? And if Hezbollah is your proxy to say that Iran did, then what was the 2006 invasion of Lebanon about?

Speaking of chickens and eggs, though, there’s something left out of this formulation. The US.

As I noted back in December, the reporting of David Sanger (whose beat seems to be precisely the intersection of US and Israeli covert ops) seems to suggest that our drones have been surveilling now-dead Iranian scientists.

So David Sanger, the (American and Israeli) intelligence community’s chief mouthpiece to boast about their latest victories against Iran, by-lined this story from Boston (rather than his home base of DC) to tell us the Sentinel drone was surveilling Iran’s suspected nuclear sites, using its isotope-sniffing powers.

In addition to video cameras, independent experts say the drone almost certainly carries communications intercept equipment and sensors that can detect tiny amounts of radioactive isotopes and other chemicals that can give away nuclear research.

But the real advantage of the Sentinel drone, Sanger and Shane tell us, is the ability to see who’s onsite when.

While an orbiting surveillance satellite can observe a location for only a few minutes at a time, a drone can loiter for hours, sending a video feed as people move about the site. Such a “pattern of life,” as it is called, can give crucial clues to the nature of the work being done, the equipment used and the size of the work force.

Actually, we knew that. Here’s the kind of information the Sentinel presumably gave us about Osama bin Laden’s compound.

Agents, determining that Kuwaiti was living there, used aerial surveillance to keep watch on the compound, which consisted of a three-story main house, a guesthouse, and a few outbuildings. They observed that residents of the compound burned their trash, instead of putting it out for collection, and concluded that the compound lacked a phone or an Internet connection. Kuwaiti and his brother came and went, but another man, living on the third floor, never left. When this third individual did venture outside, he stayed behind the compound’s walls. Some analysts speculated that the third man was bin Laden, and the agency dubbed him the Pacer.

In our assassination of Osama bin Laden, it seems, we used the Sentinel to learn the daily routine of everyone in the compound. Just the kind of information we’ve used to assassinate key Iranian scientists.

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US Keeps Losing Control of Its Drones

Funny how these drones keep experiencing failures in areas where they’re engaging in a covert war and not–say–where they’re being used to arrest American citizens in North Dakota.

One of the Air Force’s premier drones crashed Tuesday morning in the Seychelles, the Indian Ocean archipelago that serves as a base for anti-piracy operations, as well as U.S. surveillance missions over Somalia.

[snip]

The Seychelles, where U.S. officials have worked closely with local officials to establish the drone base, is hardly enemy territory, and the drone that crashed Tuesday was operated by the Air Force, not the CIA, which operated the stealth RQ-170 that crashed in Iran.

Still, Tuesday’s crash once again illustrates the fallibility of unmanned aerial vehicles.

I guess as drone use ramps up here in the US maybe we’ll need to consult with whomever has sabotaged drones of late in multiple countries?

Obama to Iran: Please Give Our Assassination Surveillance Drone Back

Sorry, this is absurd.

“We have asked for [our Sentinel drone] back. We’ll see how the Iranians respond,” Obama said during a joint news conference with Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki after the two met at the White House.

We violate Iran’s airspace, almost certainly conducting surveillance to support illegal assassinations, and we have the audacity to ask for our legally-suspect drone back?!?!

What are we going to offer them in exchange? Manssor Arbabsiar and a number of other, more competent spies to be named later? Because doesn’t the request for the drone implicitly suggest assassinations are acceptable and really shouldn’t interfere with polite diplomacy?

Besides, doesn’t this violate trade sanctions on Iran?

Emptywheel Twitterverse
bmaz RT @SpyTalker: #Oil Spill You've Never Heard of Leaking Into Gulf of #Mexico for a Decade #pollution .@zoeschlanger @Newsweek http://t.co/y
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JimWhiteGNV RT @gatorhoops: Pretty good day sports-wise for #Gators. Gymnastics third straight NC, softball sweep of Georgia, and 5th straight SEC base…
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bmaz This is simply an asinine comment https://t.co/1zOP1GEsf6
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JimWhiteGNV RT @onlygators: THREE-PEAT: Florida #Gators gymnastics has won its third straight NCAA National Championship.
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emptywheel @AllThingsHLS By then the dogs will respond to both names. And prefer Beast A La Mode! @Empowlr
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bmaz @copiesofcopies Obviously! I mean even hard core crim defense attys who thought they were shady never guessed it was all this bad.
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emptywheel @AllThingsHLS I'll still call them Beast and A La Mode until the Squawks beat the Pats. @Empowlr
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bmaz Is there anything the vaunted FBI Crime Lab has NOT fucked up or faked over the years? Nope.
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emptywheel Remember, judges say govt has a "presumption of regularity." Their hair forensics--and everything else--assumed true.
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emptywheel @susanzalkind Thinking of IG's long work. Forensic kiosks not safe. They can't count NSLs. They don't track SIGINT source. @onekade
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emptywheel @HectorSolon He has them stored in potholes. W/everything else MI has in excess.
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emptywheel RT @lhfang: I talked to Cruz, Jindal, Graham, Huckabee and others re Sen. Cotton's claim war w/Iran would end in "several days" http://t.co
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