William Welch Probably NOT One of the Attorneys Who Engaged in Gross Prosecutorial Misconduct in Stevens Case

As Ryan Reilly reported, Judge Emmet Sullivan is moving forward with his plan to release the scathing report on the Ted Stevens prosecution showing the prosecution was “permeated by the systematic concealment of significant exculpatory evidence.”

Back when descriptions of this report first surfaced, I asked, “Why Is William Welch, Whose Team Is Accused of Intentional Prosecutorial Misconduct, Still at DOJ?

Given Sullivan’s latest order, I think the answer must be that Welch is not one of the four DOJ lawyers most badly implicated in the report. That’s because DOJ, which after all still employs Welch to prosecute whistleblowers, had no objection to the report being released on March 15.

The Department of Justice’s Notice advised the Court that it “does not intend to file a motion regarding Mr. Schuelke’s report” and that “[t]he government does not contend that there is any legal prohibition on the disclosure of any references in Mr. Schuelke’s report to grand jury material, court authorized interceptions of wire communications, or any sealed pleadings or transcripts that have now been unsealed.” Notice of Dep’t of Justice Regarding Materials Referenced in Mr. Schuelke’s Report, at 1-2 (“DOJ Notice”). In addition, the Department of Justice informed the Court that it was not asserting any deliberative process or attorney-work product privilege with respect to the information contained in Mr. Schuelke’s Report.

Criminal Division head Lanny Breuer has already proven himself more than willing to hide the misconduct of his prosecutors; I have no doubt he’d do so here if it badly implicated any of his current attorneys.

So I’m guessing–though that is a guess–that Welch is not one of the four fighting to prevent this release.

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9 Responses to William Welch Probably NOT One of the Attorneys Who Engaged in Gross Prosecutorial Misconduct in Stevens Case

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Emptywheel Twitterverse
emptywheel @onekade Assume he's been and gone--no way they'd bring him in during shelling, he might see war crimes. So...they used cease fire for him.
18mreplyretweetfavorite
emptywheel Presumably, Israel used cease fire (such as it existed) to get Wolf Blitzer into a tunnel, correct?
20mreplyretweetfavorite
JimWhiteGNV RT @MoonofA: New on MoA: NBCNews Buries Its Own Journalist's Eyes, Modifies Gaza Story - http://t.co/3XnNRf3b9u
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emptywheel @ViscResponse My MillaniaLab is too old to get into the egress window where they've formed the mother ship. He can have what escapes.
36mreplyretweetfavorite
bmaz @joanwalsh @Salon Yes, indeed.
37mreplyretweetfavorite
bmaz @TyreJim @sarahjeong Seconded.
42mreplyretweetfavorite
JimWhiteGNV Before they were #TerrorTunnels, they were food and medicine tunnels that were needed to get around collective punishment.
47mreplyretweetfavorite
JimWhiteGNV @wheeliesmom I'm not. I said they would never do it.
50mreplyretweetfavorite
emptywheel @AthertonKD Dunno if thta's worse than losing $9B in cash in Iraq, though. Just ... bad. @SIGARHQ
51mreplyretweetfavorite
emptywheel RT @ryanjreilly: 4th Circuit trolls Scalia! http://t.co/43L4eivavW
55mreplyretweetfavorite
JimWhiteGNV They'll never do it, but Israel could score big pub rel pts by allowing in food and medical supplies when closing tunnels. Was orig reason.
56mreplyretweetfavorite
bmaz They are right RT @AntDeRosa Former Blackwater contractors on trial accuse government of suppressing evidence http://t.co/TmKHSE6t1e
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