Opening Week: Baseball and Bombs

The Yankees and Red Sox both finally won games yesterday after starting their seasons 0-3, while the Taliban have opened their season with a new offense.

The very fact that the US has been in Afghanistan so long that the press uses matter-of-fact phrasing to refer to the opening of fighting season demonstrates the depravity to which this war has descended. Today saw a number of bomb attacks across Afghanistan, with the death toll approaching 20 at the time of this writing.

The opening of the season, as described by the Washington Post:

At least 18 people, including police and civilians, were killed in attacks in Afghanistan on Tuesday, a spate of violence that coincides with the start of the country’s traditional fighting season.

Reuters notes the opening in this way:

Suicide bombers killed at least nineteen people in attacks across Afghanistan on Tuesday, including 11 Afghan police, as insurgents ramped up violence ahead of the traditional summer fighting months.

To their credit, the New York Times avoided the season cliche, but their article was centered on the Herat bombing alone.

In crafting its new version of “victory” language, NATO is claiming that the Taliban will not be carrying out a spring offensive this year aimed at large NATO bases. Instead, as today’s bombings demonstrate, it appears that the targets will be Afghan security forces, government officials and civilians.

Returning to the Reuters article:

A NATO spokesman on Monday said insurgents had so far shown no sign of planning a repeat of last year’s unified spring offensive against foreign and Afghan forces, preferring isolated attacks on small units and bases.

The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for the Helmand attack, saying it had been targeting the district governor and police chief, as well as other government officials.

Attacking Afghan police units and local authorities will make the planned exit of NATO forces much more difficult if these attacks result in fewer Afghans being willing to serve in these positions, since the stated strategy is to hand over authority to them as NATO forces withdraw.

So far, I’ve found no evidence that anyone has formed a fantasy league for the fighting in Afghanistan, so we haven’t completely plumbed the depths of how low this can go.

Update: Oh my. Alissa Rubin has updated her New York Times article so that it now covers the whole string of bombings, not just Herat. The new opening paragraph:

In a further sign that the insurgents’ spring offensive is under way, suicide bombers struck in western and southern Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing as many as 18 people, according to Afghan officials in Herat and Helmand, where the attacks took place.


Many years ago, Jim got a BA in Radiation Biophysics from the University of Kansas. He then got a PhD in Molecular Biology from UCLA and did postdoctoral research in yeast genetics at UC Berkeley and mouse retroviruses at Stanford. He joined biosys in Palo Alto, producing insect parasitic nematodes for pest control. In the early 1990’s, he moved to Gainesville, FL and founded a company that eventually became Entomos. He left the firm as it reorganized into Pasteuria Biosciences and chose not to found a new firm due a clash of values with venture capital investors, who generally lack all values. Upon leaving, he chose to be a stay at home dad, gentleman farmer, cook and horse wrangler. He discovered the online world through commenting at Glenn Greenwald’s blog in the Salon days and was involved in the briefly successful Chris Dodd move to block the bill to renew FISA. He then went on to blog at Firedoglake and served a brief stint as evening editor there. When the Emptywheel blog moved out of Firedoglake back to standalone status, Jim tagged along and blogged on anthrax, viruses, John Galt, Pakistan and Afghanistan. He is now a mostly lapsed blogger looking for a work-around to the depressing realization that pointing out the details of government malfeasance and elite immunity has approximately zero effect.
14 replies
  1. Bob Schacht says:

    NRS 2 Samuel 11:1 “In the spring of the year, the time when kings go out to battle,…”
    NRS 2 Kings 13:20 “… Now bands of Moabites used to invade the land in the spring of the year.”
    1 Chronicles 20:1 “In the spring of the year, the time when kings go out to battle,…”

    I guess the reason it’s a cliche is that it has been true for so long. Note that our Bible ties “bands of Moabites” as well as Kings to this proclivity. Just change “Moabites” to “Taliban” and we’re there.

    Bob in AZ

  2. emptywheel says:

    Don’t you mean the Tigers swept the Sox? Cause that’s the way I heard about the BoSox early season.

  3. Tom Allen says:

    I can’t wait for the next White House Correspondents’ Dinner. I’m sure there will be a routine with:

    Who blew up first.
    What blew up second.
    I don’t know. — Third infantry.

    (And all the journalists there will laugh, laugh, laugh.)

  4. JTMinIA says:

    To avoid offending people who don’t like the “season” analogy, maybe the monthly death-tolls should be altered using something like the “seasonally adjusted” rates for things like home sales and unemployment. Sounds like a job for Nate S.

  5. PeasantParty says:

    @Tom Allen: I’ll not run over to third base/New York Times to read the score. I much prefer to hear it from the announcers here.

    Who is on home plate?

  6. PeasantParty says:


    You know how I feel about our land grab plans for the ME. Why is it that everytime I hear of new deaths and bombings that my mind automatically thinks of a US Agent Provocateur type operation?

  7. earlofhuntingdon says:

    As you say, making such things “seasonal” – shades of Tet offensives – seems to be a standard trope in making them perpetual. Good for defense and intel industry stocks, their executives and politicians; for everyone else, not so much.

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