Declan McCullagh

ECPA Amendments and Privacy in a Post Petraeus World

One of the issues making the rounds like wildfire today was a report from Declan McCullagh at CNET regarding certain proposed amendments to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). The article is entitled “Senate Bill Rewrite Lets Feds Read Your E-mail Without Warrants” and relates:

A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans’ e-mail privacy has been quietly rewritten, giving government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law.

CNET has learned that Patrick Leahy, the influential Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, has dramatically reshaped his legislation in response to law enforcement concerns. A vote on his bill, which now authorizes warrantless access to Americans’ e-mail, is scheduled for next week.

Leahy’s rewritten bill would allow more than 22 agencies — including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Communications Commission — to access Americans’ e-mail, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a search warrant. It also would give the FBI and Homeland Security more authority, in some circumstances, to gain full access to Internet accounts without notifying either the owner or a judge. (CNET obtained the revised draft from a source involved in the negotiations with Leahy.)

This sounds like the predictably craven treachery that regularly comes out of Senate, indeed Congressional, legislation on privacy issues. And exactly what many had hoped would cease coming out of Washington after the public scrutiny brought on by the Petraeus/Broadwell/Kelley scandal. And, should these amendments make it into law, they may yet prove detrimental.

But there are a couple of problems here. First, as Julian Sanchez noted, those abilities by the government already substantially exist.

Lots of people RTing CNET’s story today seem outraged Congress might allow access to e-mail w/o warrant—but that’s the law ALREADY!

Well, yes. Secondly, and even more problematic, is Pat Leahy vehemently denies the CNET report. In fact, Senator Leahy does not support broad exemptions for warrantless searches for email content. A source within the Judiciary Committee described the situation as follows: Continue reading

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JimWhiteGNV RT @GatorZoneScott: Wayward bull gets frisky with cars near Harwthorne via @GainesvilleSun -- http://t.co/uDEZNcTNUD http://t.co/PAO5sWcU5t
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bmaz @CoxArizona Maybe you could check your [email protected] inbox?
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bmaz @nickmartin Pretty big trial locally.
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emptywheel RT @ChadLivengood: ICYMI: Most #Michigan lawmakers dodge @AP survey on how they're personally voting on #MiProp1 http://t.co/knFAjJsXe6 via…
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bmaz RT @ddayen: No Senate Republicans sign on to letter to give living wages to the employees that serve them every day. http://t.co/RI6orMZ5io
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bmaz And, magically! w/that new juror, a guilty verdict came in 2 hours or less in the Hunter trial. Amazing! #WhatASham https://t.co/OHjUAOq4dB
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bmaz @nickmartin Jury told to start all over again, but rendered guilty verdict within 2 hours. Incredible.
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bmaz @nickmartin I googled her. Fox News Supreme Court reporter apparently.
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bmaz @froomkin @coracurrier They SHOULD be part of the record unless done solely through probation office PSI.
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