Ron DeSantis Attempting to Stop Criminal Investigation into Theft that Benefitted Him

Florida Congressman Ron DeSantis has presented a bill that would defund the Robert Mueller investigation six months after the bill passed.

DeSantis has put forward a provision that would halt funding for Mueller’s probe six months after the amendment’s passage. It also would prohibit Mueller from investigating matters that occurred before June 2015, when Trump launched his presidential campaign.

The amendment is one of hundreds filed to a government spending package the House is expected to consider when it returns next week from the August recess. The provision is not guaranteed a vote on the House floor; the House Rules Committee has wide leeway to discard amendments it considers out of order.

It’s interesting that DeSantis, of all people, would push this bill.

After all, he’s one of a small list of members of Congress who directly benefitted from Guccifer 2.0’s leaking. Florida political journalist Aaron Nevins obtained a huge chunk of documents from Guccifer 2.0.

Last year, a Republican political operative and part-time blogger from Florida asked for and received an extensive list of stolen data from Guccifer 2.0, the infamous hacker known for leaking documents from the DNC computer network.

The Wall Street Journal reported that Aaron Nevins, a former aide to Republican state Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, had reached out to Guccifer through Twitter, asking to “feel free to send any Florida-based information.”

About 10 days later, Nevins received about 2.5 gigabytes of polling information, election strategy and other data, which he then posted on his political gossip blog HelloFLA.com.

“I just threw an arrow in the dark,” Nevins told the Journal.

After setting up a Dropbox account for Guccifer 2.0 to share the data, Nevins was able to sift through the data as someone who “actually knows what some of these documents mean.”

Among the documents stolen from the DCCC that Nevins published are five documents on the DCCC’s recruitment of DeSantis’ opponent, George Pappas. So effectively, DeSantis is trying to cut short the investigation into a crime from which he directly benefitted.

Call me crazy, but this seems like an ethical violation, and possibly a good reason to submit a bar complaint against DeSantis. And his constituents might want to ask why he’s trying to help Russia and its domestic enablers undermine democracy.

Marcy Wheeler is an independent journalist writing about national security and civil liberties. She writes as emptywheel at her eponymous blog, publishes at outlets including Vice, Motherboard, the Nation, the Atlantic, Al Jazeera, and appears frequently on television and radio. She is the author of Anatomy of Deceit, a primer on the CIA leak investigation, and liveblogged the Scooter Libby trial.

Marcy has a PhD from the University of Michigan, where she researched the “feuilleton,” a short conversational newspaper form that has proven important in times of heightened censorship. Before and after her time in academics, Marcy provided documentation consulting for corporations in the auto, tech, and energy industries. She lives with her spouse in Grand Rapids, MI.

5 replies
  1. Rugger9 says:

    The ethical standard for the GOP is winning, nothing else matters.  As noted in the book “1984” the purpose of power is power.

    With that said I do not see any GOP congressthing getting investigated by a GOP congressional majority.  Since their moral compass is out of alignment with basic civility, no GOP congressthing will resign either unless there’s a job at Fox waiting for them (Hi, Jason!).

    If the connection can be proved, it is probably criminal but we are also talking about Rick Scott’s and Pam Bondi’s Florida so nothing will be pursued.  Also, the McDonnell ruling by SCOTUS gutting the corruption statutes (why is Siegelman still in jail?  Oh, he’s a Democrat) means that it is much harder to prove.

  2. SpaceLifeForm says:

    OT: The ‘intel inside’ the Intel Inside (Intel ME – Management Engine)

    (aka, a backdoor buried in silicon)

    This is very technical, heres the TL;DR

    The chips inside an intel motherboard to support ME include an actual processor. Recent versions of the ME processor are based on old Intel tech, basically a merge of old 486 and Pentium tech. 32 bit. Running a modified Minix OS. Minix happens to be the OS Linus used to originally bootstrap Linux.

    So, anyone with a new intel mothetboard is actually a *nix user! Not really since the user can not really access it. Which leads to the security concerns many have had for years.

    Can one disable ME?

    After years of digging, it appears it is possible.

    Interestingly, it also appears that TLAs may already have a way to disable ME.

    This would imply that IC is concerned about the security aspect from their own defensive posture, but everyone else is fair game to be hacked as far as they are concerned.

    Note Google uses AMD, not Intel.

    http://blog.ptsecurity.com/2017/08/disabling-intel-me.html

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